Book Reviews, Contemporary

A Song For Issy Bradley – Carys Bray Review

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Rating: ★★★★★

I’m currently on a mission to get through the books I have acquired over the years and have not yet read, and A Song For Issy Bradley has been sitting on my shelf for over a year. I was not expecting much from it, not being a huge fan of contemporary fiction, but this book blew me away. I found it to be really moving, and couldn’t put it down.

Issy Bradley is the youngest daughter of Ian and Claire. The Bradley family also includes daughter Zipporah, or ‘Zippy’, and sons Alma and Jacob, and the family are devout Mormons. The book opens on Jacob’s birthday, and mother Claire is struggling to prepare for the birthday party she will throw for him as Ian is away on church business. She is so busy that she doesn’t have enough time to check on Issy, who has been feeling poorly, and by the time she does, she realises that Issy’s illness is far worse than the flu. Before she has time to process it, Issy is in intensive care with meningitis, and despite the family’s prayers, Issy passes away.

The rest of the book follows each member of the Bradley family as they grieve, or struggle to grieve, in their individual ways. Ian feels comforted by his faith, and his confidence that he will be reunited with his daughter in the afterlife helps him to continue with his normal life. Meanwhile, Claire cannot see a way to move on, and Zippy has to step into her mother’s shoes, cooking and cleaning while dealing with confusion over dating in a religious setting. Alma’s love of football is tainted by memories of playing with Issy, and Jacob is faithful that God will answer his prayers to bring Issy back. Each chapter follows a different family member in turn, and follows their individual storylines in conjunction with their grief for Issy.

I loved each character’s story, which I think is a rare feat in a multiple-POV narrative. I think this was assisted by the fact that each character had such a different tone. Jacob’s belief that he can resurrect Issy is a humorous break from Claire’s incredibly sorrowful chapters. Zippy and Alma are struggling with challenges outside of Issy’s death, but in fear of adding to their family’s problems, they try to deal with it themselves. Ian and Claire’s relationship is crumbling under the strain of the loss and the now evident differences in their faith. The novel is a really beautiful and moving look at how a family deals with loss, individually and as a family, coming together to put the pieces back together.

Carys Bray’s writing is simple but not basic, with the emotions that the characters feel being clear and moving. I think she was really good at giving each character a strong tone that stood out from the others. Alma is angry and resentful of the way his father’s religion has crushed his childhood dreams of being a footballer, Zippy is growing into a woman and Jacob is naive and sweet. This made it easy to deliver into the characters of the different narrators, their lives and their minds, and to really understand them.

I also found the insight into the Mormon faith and lifestyle fascinating, and the different perspectives, from those who were confident in their faith and found peace and comfort in the teachings, to those who struggled with it and those who altogether turned away from it. In my opinion, it was a delicate and subtle insight into religious life and the challenges that come with growing up and living in a religious community.

Overall, I really loved A Song for Issy Bradley and thought it was truly moving. Despite the heavy subject matter, it was not difficult to get through, and the different characters narrating the story did not confuse or distract from the story.

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Book Reviews, Contemporary, Historical

Homegoing – Yaa Gyasi Review

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Rating: ★★★★★

Homegoing is a breathtaking look at the effects of slavery over centuries, spanning generations and continents. It is an epic family saga containing stories of love, trauma, loss, war, and friendship. it was a beautiful and moving read, and I was very impressed at how Yaa Gyasi covered so much in terms of scope, and yet managed to make each story feel personal.

The premise of this novel is that two half-sisters, unknown to each other and who live in different villages, in eighteenth-century Ghana are thrust into different lives by chance. Effia is married to an Englishman and lives her life in the Cape Coast Castle, ignoring the slaves that are being held beneath her, destined for another life. Esi however is captured and taken to America, where she lives the difficult life of a slave. Each chapter of the novel follows a different generation in the two strands of the family, focusing in on one individual, at a significant time in their life. Effia’s descendants experience warfare between tribes in Ghana, and the fight for freedom from British rule. Esi’s descendants are bought and sold as slaves, live through the Civil War, forced labour prisons, jazz and crime.

Homegoing is a look at the history of two nations through individuals’ lives, and this is what makes it so moving. It is easy to talk of the historical and social events covered in this novel from a detached perspective without truly understanding the human impact. The main thing that struck me while reading Homegoing was that it makes it clear, in a visceral and shocking way, through the memories of the characters, how recent the events that we consider ‘history’ actually are.

I really loved the format of this novel, with each chapter following a different person. We get a snapshot of life at a particular time, band I liked the experience of becoming invested in a character over the course of their chapter and to feel invested in their story, only to have them ripped away at the end. Each chapter felt like it ended too soon, but I didn’t resent it. Rather, it felt like this served a larger purpose of giving the stories and emotions inside of them more immediacy, and it gives the book constant momentum as you are always being thrust forward. It may take getting used to, but the chapters are each so brilliantly written that you won’t struggle to get into them. The writing is also so excellent, with fire and water imagery running through the novel, and I didn’t find it difficult to follow who was who, because usually the character is introduced, at least briefly, in the previous chapter.

Overall, I really loved reading Homegoing. I loved how Yaa Gyasi wrapped up the novel in a bittersweet bow at the end, neat and tidy, but not forced or difficult to believe. When I put it down, I was left wanting aching to return to the characters and learn more about them. It gives you a lot of food for thought, and indeed left me thinking about its contents for days afterward.

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Book Reviews, Contemporary

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine – Gail Honeyman Review

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Rating: ★★★★

I’ve been seeing this book everywhere for months, and was so happy that I finally got around to reading it, and I can definitely see what all of the fuss was about. Eleanor Oliphant lives a strictly regimented, monotonous, but ‘fine’ life. She has never questioned her life that consists purely of going to work, and drinking at the weekends, with nobody to talk to apart from her mother who calls her once a week, and the social workers who visit every once in a while. However, when she meets Raymond, who work in IT, and they help save the life of a stranger in the street, she begins to question her life, how she got there, and what it will take for her to get better.

I absolutely loved Eleanor’s character. She was so complex and interesting, and although she clearly suffers a great deal with trauma, anxiety issues and a lack of social skills, her voice is so unique and at times downright hilarious that it was a pleasure to read the book, even when if she is spending entire pages explaining how boring and lonely her life is. This doesn’t mean that you don’t feel bad for Eleanor. Her life is the same everyday, and she has nobody to talk to, she doesn’t even think she needs anyone to talk to, but what I liked was that even at the start of Eleanor’s story, before she sets out on her journey of recovery and self-discovery, is that there is a quiet strength to her. She has lived through horror, and now she is living through loneliness, and she deals with it in the only way that she can, which is building an armour around her. Even if we don’t relate to her specific problems and experiences, I’m sure every reader can relate to the way that Eleanor deals with her problems and anxieties, by simply ignoring them and pretending that she doesn’t need whatever she is missing out on.

I loved reading her development through relationships with people around her. Raymond was a wonderful character to read, and I loved how we see Eleanor thinking of him as nothing but a lazy, wasteful and immature man, to thinking of him as a friend and genuinely valuing him. She takes this journey with many people in her life, such as the people in her work, and so the book is a beautiful and heartbreaking exploration of Eleanor’s loneliness and the way that society plays a role in further isolating those who struggle socially, but ends with hopefulness that Eleanor can recover with the help of those around her, and lead a fulfilling and fruitful life that makes her more than ‘just fine’.

The only issues that I had with this book lay with the storyline of Eleanor trying to piece together the traumas that she experienced as a child. Without spoiling this story, the main issue that I had with this was that it only really became a plot point towards the end of the novel. Although we know from early on that Eleanor has had horrible experiences, it just isn’t a concern of hers. This is understandable from the context of her character arc, but I would have liked for there to have been hints as to what the story was, and elements of foreboding rather than simply dumping the story on us out of the blue in the final chapters of the book. In a strange sense, I felt like the book could have been even more striking if it had lacked the dramatic ‘tragic backstory’ element, as I felt a little like Honeyman shifted the story away from a character-focused story to a story that relies on shocks and plot twists to keep you hooked. By the time I found out what had happened to Eleanor, I found that I didn’t really care that much, cause I was too interested in the rest of her character.

This book made me laugh, cry, and stayed with me for long after I finished it. I found it easy to read and loved the strong voice of the main character Eleanor, and how it drove the story forward and kept me hooked.

Book Reviews, Contemporary

Big Little Lies – Liane Moriarty Review

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Rating: ★★★★

I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

You have probably heard about this book. There was a little tiny adaptation starring Reese Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman, Shailene Woodley, and so many other A-listers. It was this that brought the book to my attention, and I have been itching to read it for months. Thankfully, NetGalley offered me the opportunity to read it and post a review, so here we go. In case you want the quick version: I loved this!

Big Little Lies centres around a small coastal town where everyone knows everyone, especially the mothers at the Pirriwee Public School. Madeleine, Celeste, and Jane meet on the first day of school, where they have all dropped their children off at their first day of kindergarten. However, when they pick them up, an allegation of bullying sets off a startling chain of events that ends in tragedy. The plot is riveting, and what made it so for me was that each chapter began and ended with excerpts from interviews after a fundraiser at the school, and through these excerpts, it becomes clear that somebody has died. But who died, and how they died, remains a mystery until the very end. Although this death is not premeditated and the central storyline is much more of a ‘family drama’ novel, there are signs that the tension in Pirriwee is increasing, and the novel slowly builds suspense until the big finale, making it a truly gripping read.

I also loved the differences in the three women. Madeleine is a fun and energetic woman, with three children, who struggles with the fact that her ex-husband has moved back to town with his second wife and child, who is starting school with her own daughter. Celeste lives in a golden cage of sorts, in a marriage that she questions from the start of the book, but is admired for her beauty and wealth. Jane is new to town, a young single mother, who falls into the friendship of Madeleine and Celeste with ease. The differences in these women made the book more interesting, and I also loved that they each had their individual storylines unfolding in the background, all of which came together at the end in an explosive conclusion.

My only issues with the book lay with the ending. Don’t get me wrong, I revelled in the plot twists and the dramatic ending to the Pirriwee Public School tensions, but what I hated was the way that Liane Moriarty tried so hard to tie everything up in neat little bows after that. I would have much preferred to have a more messy, more human ending to the book. Instead, there was forced romance which was completely unnecessary, predictable, and without chemistry, and an epilogue that made me cringe with information dumps about where the characters were months later, that also simply wasn’t needed. The forced nature of the happy endings simply didn’t fit with the nature of the book, or with the characters as they had been developed over the course of the books, and was simply unrealistic to the extent that I feel like it really weakened the book overall.

Overall however, I did really enjoy this book. I couldn’t put it down, as I was hoping, and the plot and characters stayed with me after I finished reading.

 

Book Reviews, Contemporary

You – Caroline Kepnes Review

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Rating: ★★★★★

I have a secret love of true crime documentaries, particularly, anything to do with scary serial killers and their psychology. Even though they leave me creeped out for days afterwards, I also enjoy the fear a little bit. This book felt just like those documentaries feel, but worse. If you’re looking for a book to make you feel a bit creeped out – or probably, very creeped out – look no further. Let me introduce you to the scariest book I have ever read.

You is a story told from the perspective of Joe, a bookseller in a used and rare bookstore. One day, Beck walks into his store, a young creative writing student, and he is instantly smitten. But, this isn’t just a crush. Joe descends into a full-blown obsession with Beck, ehe is determined to have her, and will do anything to remove obstacles between them. The novel traces his various manoeuvres to not only successfully meet Beck, but to get her to fall in love with him, and to keep her by his side.

Hands down the best thing about this novel was the narration. The entire story is told from Joe’s perspective, in the second person, as if he is talking to Beck directly – the ‘You’ of the title. The effect of this is striking from the first page, and Kepnes really captures Joe’s voice as he explains everything that he is thinking and feeling. Sometimes it reads like he is writing a letter to Beck, sometimes it reads more like a stream of consciousness narrative, as if we are actually listening to his own inner thought process. It is incredibly effective, and elevates the creepiness factor to brilliant heights.

The plot itself is also exciting. Joe has no limits, and it makes the book both a thrilling and horrifying read. On the one hand, you’re intrigued to see how much further Joe will go to secure his goal. With every new thing that he does, you are shocked to find that he has taken that extra step, from tracking down a person’s social media, to their address, to their location on various social outings. By the halfway point, I was convinced that the rest of the book would be a downhill ride, because how could Kepnes keep up the pace, but she did! On the other hand, it’s also terrifying to read, as you realise that Joe has no boundaries, and that he doesn’t care. He understands social norms and that his actions would be considered weird or dangerous, but in his mind, he is justified, and it is everyone else that is insane.

Overall, this book was brilliant from start to finish. It was a tightly woven story that never got boring, the stakes were consistently being raised to heighten tension, and the second person narrative escalated the suspense even more to the point where, at times, I was trembling with shock and excitement at the latest plot twist. I could not recommend this more, but warning: it will scare you.

Book Reviews, Contemporary

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz

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Rating: ★★★

I have found it so hard to review this book because it is so unlike most of the books I have read. Junot Díaz’s writing is unique and effortless, it is a beautiful read and loved the intertwining of stories, but I sometimes felt like the overall story and unity of the various plots suffered under the weight of them all.

The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao is, obviously, about Oscar. He is an overweight, nerdy, and eternally lovesick Dominican boy who lives with his mother and sister. He wants desperately to experience love, and although he experiences it very often, he has yet to have it be returned. Díaz’s narrative spreads not only across Oscar’s formative years, but as far back as previous generations, exploring the curse, or Fuku, that they believe has overshadowed their lives for decades.

I did enjoy this aspect of intergenerational storytelling, and particularly in the context of talking about an immigrant Latino family, it felt very appropriate. In my own Latin American upbringing, I have always been raised to consider my family history to be as strong a part of my identity as my own likes and dislikes, so I could really relate to this method of exploring Oscar’s life and beliefs and the events that had formed him. The experiences of his relatives even years before directly impacted his life, and by the end, we not only see a clear chain of events across generations, but also wonder whether the Fuku is real.

The downside to this was that sometimes I just found this secondary stories to drag on a bit. There were things that I didn’t understand the importance of, meanwhile other storylines were left by the wayside and I would have liked to have had the chance to explore more. As interesting as the stories of the different characters were as standalone stories, and even though by their end I could see how they linked in to Oscar’s story, sometimes while reading them I felt lost in their story and struggled to see the importance of some of the detail. Also, despite understanding that these events and people formed Oscar’s own identity and life, I felt like Oscar’s own story at times felt weak. For example, the final chapters of his story felt simply silly at times, and whilst his neediness and desperation for love had been endearing, I simply grew frustrated with his narrow-mindedness and decisions, and the ending, rather than feeling poignant and moving, just felt a bit – dare I say it – stupid.

Overall, I do appreciate Junot Díaz’s talent in writing this book, and I do appreciate the various features of its structure and storytelling, but I simply didn’t like the plot. It felt disjointed at times, and the main plot and character disappointed me.

Book Reviews, Contemporary, Historical

The Penelopiad – Margaret Atwood

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Rating: ★★★★

I’ve wanted to read more work by Margaret Atwood since I read The Handmaid’s Tale at school, but I’ve never gotten around to it. When a friend recommended this book to me, and then by lucky coincidence I found a second hand copy a few days later, I decided to give it a try. I was not disappointed. Atwood’s writing is so easy to read but its simplicity is wound up with subtle commentary on the world around us.

The Penelopiad is a retelling of Homer’s The Odyssey. In the original tale, Odysseus leaves his home and wife to fight for Helen in the Trojan War, setting off on a decades long journey battling monsters and sleeping with goddesses. When he returns home, a hundred suitors are vying for his wife’s attention, and he kills them all, and his wife’s twelve maids, for betraying him. Atwood’s version, however, gives Penelope a voice of her own, agency, and strength. In this story, Penelope’s role is more than just that of a sitting duck. She develops a scheme of her own to, alongside her maids, keep the suitors at bay, by lying to and manipulating them. Although when Odysseus returns home her experiences are ignored, the story gives her a life, depth, and character.

Atwood shows us Penelope’s life before she met Odysseus, her views of him, or her cousin Helen, of the island where he takes her, of her life when he disappears. We see the life of a woman who hears nothing of her husband for decades but rumours of his exciting travels, death-defying feats, and different sexual partners, all whilst she remains at home trying to be the perfect wife. My favourite part of it, however, was the fact that Margaret shows us Penelope’s life after death. The story is told by Penelope from the other side of the River Styx, looking back on her life. It’s interesting to hear a story told by someone who has the benefit of hindsight, and even better, we see her interactions with the people that she knew in life, and so, in a very small amount of pages, Atwood shows us all of these ancient characters in a variety of different positions, and at various times of their lives. For example, Penelope’s twelve maids appear as a chorus after every chapter, giving their own commentary on the events.

The Penelopiad is a very short book, and so it was a quick, single-day read, and I really enjoyed it. I have not read The Odyssey, but I was familiar with the story, and I always find it interesting to see retellings of familiar stories. I loved the focus on the women in the story, who are relegated to minor, background roles in the original, but are now given a starring role. I also liked how Atwood gave Penelope depth, but that her character was not typically ‘nice’. She is a faithful wife, but that is not all that she is – she has a mind of her own. Overall, I really enjoyed reading The Penelopiad, and I can’t wait to read some more of Atwood’s work.

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Book Reviews, Contemporary

The Vegetarian – Han Kong Review

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Rating: ★★★★

This book was recommended to me by a friend who absolutely loved it, and  I was intrigued by it because she had said she found it difficult to describe properly. To put it simply, this is a book about a woman who spontaneously decides to become a vegetarian,  and the effects of this decision. The novel actually touches upon issues such as women’s place in society, freedom, identity and mental health.

Yeong-hye and her husband have an ordinary and average life. They are ordinary and average people. That is why Yeong-hye’s decision to stop eating meat shocks her husband so much. In the first section of the novel, that is narrated by him, he tries and fails to understand his wife’s decision to change her eating habits, and how she can completely disregard his comfort, and her own appearance. He is angry that she would make such a decision without running it by him first, subject him to her dietary choices, and frankly, make any decision by herself. The subsequent two sections of the novel are also narrated by those close to Yeong-hye: her brother-in-law and her sister, as Yeong-hye is admitted into psychiatric care multiple times.

Although this is about Yeong-hye’s choice to stop eating meat, it is actually about much more than that. From the first section onwards, we see that what is really shocking to people is that she has made any decision for herself at all, that she stands by it, and that she defies tradition – her family are a family of meat-lovers, and even try to force feed her at a family dinner. Eventually, Yeong-hye’s lifestyle becomes even more radical, as her whole identity changes and she begins to become more and more like a plant, stripping to absorb sunlight and insisting that she doesn’t need food, only water. Although her decisions are seen by others as a sign of lunacy, by the end of the novel, in the section narrated by her sister, we wonder which character is most trapped.

I have read some modernist works before, and the style of writing in The Vegetarian is quite simple, so I didn’t find the novel too difficult to grasp. In fact, I read it in one day as it is quite short. I enjoyed the symbolism and the way it addressed themes such as women’s subjugation. I think that it approached this theme really well, as we see different aspects of control over women throughout the book, w whether it is her Yeong-hye’s husband’s expectation that his wife always think of his feelings first and put them before her own, her father’s violence, her brother-in-law’s obsession with her, or her sister’s doubt over how her sister is being treated.. We also barely see Yeong-hye speak herself, and her story is wholly told by those around her. However, I am grateful that this book wasn’t longer. By the end of the novel, I was starting to, not lose my way, but grow a bit tired of symbolism and allegory and wanted to return to my usual explicit action and plot. I was starting to read faster just to get ahead in the book, and so I think that I probably will have missed details in the final chapter, which I will probably return to so that I can really look at it properly.

Overall, I can see why this book made such waves when it first came out, and why it is receiving so much attention. It looks at various themes about women and society through the lenses of different characters, and really makes you think about how they play out in reality. Although I started to get bored towards the end, I put that down mainly to the fact that I wanted to finish the book by the end of the night. Whilst modernism isn’t for everyone and can be a bit difficult to get your head around or get back into if, like me, you studied modernist texts as a student, but this book at just under 200 pages isn’t too much to handle in my opinion, and unlike some older classics in modern fiction, its prose isn’t rambling or confusing at all, so it might be a good place to start.

Book Reviews, Contemporary

After You – Jojo Moyes Review

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Rating:★★

I kept forgetting to write this review, not because updating this blog is not important to me, but because I literally kept forgetting that I had even read this book. Where Me Before You stayed with me for days, I could barely be bothered to finish this one, and once I had, I realised that it had left no impact at all.

After You is the sequel to Me Before You, which you’ve probably heard about. If not, you can read my review for that book here. If you want to avoid spoilers for the first book (there’s a pretty big spoiler ahead) then, as much as I love that you have come here to read this post, I would advise you to skip this post altogether – here are some alternatives!

After You picks up a few years after Me Before You’s dramatic ending. Louisa has done what Will wanted her to do after his death – she has travelled, met people and done exciting things, but now she is back in London, working another dead-end job, and has realised that she hasn’t dealt with her grief at all, but rather has just been shoving it aside. After an accidental fall from her rooftop garden, which family think was a suicide attempt, Louisa is forced to enter a grief support group. Meanwhile, a shocking revelation in the form of a strange girl appears on her doorstep and Louisa must revisit her time with Will again.

I’ll get to the point quickly – this review really didn’t need to happen. I suspected that this would be the case before I read it, but I kept pushing on in the hopes that I would be proven wrong. Unfortunately, I was right. The mysterious new character’s identity was such a cliche that, for me, the book read too much like mediocre fanfiction. I think that as Me Before You was so driven by the relationship between Louisa and Will, Louisa on her own with a bunch (literally, so many) new characters with either a tenuous link or no link at all to the original story just didn’t work. I didn’t really care about any of the new characters, for example, I could barely differentiate one support group member from the other, and the ‘will they won’t they’ romance storyline was dull, because the relationship lacked the same banter and drama that Louisa and Will had.

I almost never wish that I hadn’t read a book before, but After You is pushing me to the limit. A quick google search told me that there will be a third book to this series. Why? Me Before You was a great, striking standalone novel, and as much as you might wonder what happened to a character after a novel ends, that isn’t enough justification to extend a story that has finished. The rest of Louisa’s story, frankly, is just not interesting in the way that Me Before You. I don’t think it’s necessary for me to say that I’ll not be reading the next book about Louisa, but i case it wasn’t clear, I won’t. I would rather just think of Me Before You as a standalone book.

Have you read After You, and if so, what did you think? What are some series that you think would have been left as a standalone, or stretched on too long?

Book Reviews, Contemporary

Attachments – Rainbow Rowell Review

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Rating:★★★

Attachments is a very sweet book, as can be expected from Rainbow Rowell, whose books are basically like good 90s/00s romcoms in literary form. I loved the split narration styles and the setting in a time where the internet was new and exciting (and confusing). However, despite this being really cute, I did feel like the plot was quite slow and most of the action was concentrated in the last few chapters of the book.

The main character of this book is Lincoln. He still hasn’t recovered from his high school girlfriend dumping him in their first year of college, and since then, has spent a decade completing different degrees and unable to move on. He is trying though. In Attachments, he has just moved on with his mother and has a proper job for the first time. He works night shifts in IT at a newspaper, reading people’s emails to make sure they aren’t doing anything they shouldn’t do. It is doing this that he stumbles upon Jennifer and Beth, best friends who talk about their lives through email. Lincoln is swept up by their friendship, but soon realises that he is feeling much more than mere curiosity. How can he make nothing into something?

My favourite thing about this book was the different styles of narrating for the different characters. Lincoln’s stories are told in normal prose, but we read Beth and Jennifer’s story through their emails. I loved the chatty tone of their chapters, and I felt like Rowell really captured the humorous, sarcastic and gossip-y tone of best friends’ conversations. It was even more interesting when the characters started experiencing problems outside of work, and you could see that there were things not being shared over email and going on behind the scenes. It really added some mystery to the novel, as you are invested in this friendship and the characters but unable to see what else is happening. It was also really funny to see the girls talking about Lincoln over email, not knowing who he is and that he is reading their emails. The use of internet in this novel was really interesting, and even though this is set in 1999/2000 in an office where internet has just been provided to staff, I felt like the idea of feeling like you know someone because you’ve seen enough of them online, only to realise that in the real world you don’t know each other at all, is quite relatable even 20 years after the time the story is set.

The story is really, really cute for these reasons. You see two sets of characters only knowing each other from a distance, all thinking about each other, but unable to take the next step and make their relationship a real thing. However, it was quite slow. Beth and Lincoln don’t even meet each other until the end, and it felt like the story built up and culminated within a few pages, making the slow development of the entire rest of the book feel glaringly obvious. It wasn’t until the end of the book that I realised how little had actually happened, especially considering that the way the story ends didn’t actually relate to anything that had happened before, it felt like the ending was rushed.

I also felt like as the story began to come to its climax, the creepiness of the situation felt more and more creepy. While I do think that it is a reality in the 21st century that people do become interested in people from afar thanks to the internet, the fact that Lincoln was learning about Beth entirely through private emails and not through, say, social media, felt very intrusive to me. I don’t think it would have felt as odd to me if it had been social media ‘stalking’, but private emails between friends that Lincoln didn’t actually need to be reading because they weren’t discussing anything against the rules felt like it was just too much.

Overall, Attachments was a nice, sweet read. I wouldn’t say it made much of an impact or made me feel anything very strongly. The story was super slow, but I still enjoyed most of it. However, I felt like as I read more and more, Lincoln went from feeling like a bit of a nerd and a loner, which I can relate to, to feeling a bit like a peeping tom, which I felt more apprehensive about.