Book Reviews, YA Contemporary, Young Adult

Goodbye Days – Jeff Zentner Review

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Rating: ★★★★

I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Goodbye Days follows Carver Briggs, who sent his friends, Mars, Eli and Blake, a simple text message one night asking where they were. It was as Mars tapped out his reply that the three friends were crashed into a truck and died, and Carver can’t shirk the feeling that it was his fault. To top it all off, his friends’ parents are asking him to help them say goodbye to their sons with ‘goodbye day’ ceremonies, all while he tries to figure out his feelings towards Eli’s girlfriend, Jesmyn. Goodbye Days was a really moving book and I loved the writing style, which was simple but emotional at the same time. I only had some problems with the characters and dialogue.

I think that Zentner did a really good job of exploring the emotional struggles of Carver following his friends’ death. After the funerals of his friends, Carver struggles with panic attacks and still sees his friends around him. He takes his sister’s advice and enlists the help of Dr. Mendez, a therapist, to help him recover, and this aspect of the story was my favourite. It was while I read this book that I realised I had not read many books showing male characters struggling with trauma and mental health problems, and so this was really refreshing to read.

The book also shows how other people are dealing with loss as Carver helps his friends’ families with ‘Goodbye Days’, where they spend one final day doing things that their loved one enjoyed doing, and sharing memories of them. I liked that each of the three families were dealing with their loss in different ways and I feel like Zentner did a really good job at allocating each of these families an appropriate amount of time to explore their stories.

Another aspect of the book is Carver’s friendship with Jesmyn, Eli’s girlfriend, as they pull together after Eli’s funeral. On the one hand, I liked how Zentner toed the line between friendship and romance so that the relationship never became too corny for the context of the overall story. On the other hand, Jesmyn quickly started to get on my nerves when it became clear that she was a bit of a manic pixie dream girl character, and aspect of her character became very repetitive. For example, the fact that she had ‘Filipino genes’ came up multiple times in random conversations, and the scene where she gets childishly excited at a thunder storm felt too childish for a teenage character to be believable. It simply felt like Zentner was shoving in some ‘different’ characteristics to make her stand out, but it felt jarring.

My only other issue with the book was that sometimes the dialogue felt unrealistic. For example, the writing style of the book was largely simplistic, but sometimes characters would dive into long speeches about their emotions, with complex imagery that did not seem real for teenage characters. It was a minor issue, because it wasn’t that  any of the writing was bad, it just sometimes felt inconsistent in style and tone.

Overall, Goodbye Days was a really good book and I loved the exploration of Carver’s mental health. It was great to read a male character dealing with their emotions, and especially via a therapist, a method which is not often portrayed positively in books. I liked the stories of grief of the different families, but Jesmyn fell flat for me and so this aspect of the book was not quite my cup of tea.

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