Bookish Tags, Other

First Line Fridays: 19th May

Welcome to the new instalment of a new feature here at Ink Drops Books!

First Lines Fridays is a weekly feature for book lovers hosted by Wandering Words. What if instead of judging a book by its cover, its author or its prestige, we judged it by its opening lines?  If you want to make your own post, feel free to use or edit the banner above, and follow the rules below:

  • Pick a book off your shelf (it could be your current read or on your TBR) and open to the first page
  • Copy the first few lines, but don’t give anything else about the book away just yet – you need to hook the reader first
  • Finally… reveal the book!

I’m hoping this is a way for me to get more excited about books I’ve put on my TBR shelf and forgotten about so this week I’ve randomly chosen among my unread books.

So, let’s begin.

At dusk they pour from the sky. They blow across the ramparts, turn cartwheels over rooftops, flutter into the ravines between houses. Entire streets swirl with them, flashing white against the cobbles. Urgent message to the inhabitants of this town, they say. Depart immediately to open country.

Do you have any idea what this book is?

Have you read it before?

Is it on your reading list too?

Keep scrolling to find out…

All the Light We Cannot See – Anthony Doerr

All-the-light-we-cannot-see

Goodreads summary:

Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is twelve, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel.

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.

Deftly interweaving the lives of Marie-Laure and Werner, [Doerr] illuminates the ways, against all odds, people try to be good to one another.  

This book was pretty much everywhere when it first came out. I kept seeing it in bookshops and was drawn in by the stunning cover. I am really interested fiction set in the World Wars, in any format, whether book, film, or television series. I was even more intrigued to see the story being told about two children, even though this isn’t a children’s book.

Hopefully I get around to reading this book soon!

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